9 May

Announcing the Subject Matter Expert program!

By Serpentius

Introduction

As you know, we've been gearing up DJs on crafting, communication, and other subjects. As the design team iterates further and builds more and more systems that will ultimately end up in Chronicles of Elyria, we get to a point where we want to ensure as much realism as possible. With a small team, it isn't always realistic that we can do enough research to be certain the immersion level we desire is met. Since all of this is happening now, we decided to enable the third of several community volunteer programs that has been eagerly waiting for its day to come.

It is with great pleasure that I introduce you to our newest program, the Community Subject Matter Expert, or SME.

We have specific areas of expertise that we're seeking input on. This list is subject to change, and is not all-inclusive.

If you feel you have advanced skills in one of these areas and your time and knowledge could be of benefit to Soulbound Studios on a volunteer basis, you may be a SME candidate!

Areas of Expertise

(This list is not exhaustive)

1. Experimental Archaeologist or Historian

a. Medieval Brewing
b. Medieval Beekeeping
c. Medieval Dyes and Paints
d. Medieval Cooking
e. Medieval Medicine/Diseases
f. Medieval Metalworking
g. Medieval Pottery craft
h. Medieval Masonry
i. Medieval/Middle Ages Society (Europe, Africa, Asia, South America, North America)
j. Medieval Navigation/Wayfinding
k. Medieval trapping/fur trade
l. Medieval Social Structures/Politics
m. Medieval Religions
n. Medieval Military History
o. Classical History
p. Mythology
q. Medieval History
r. Historical Sports
s. Historical Games
t. Historical Gambling

2. Medieval Leatherworking

a. Leather Treatments
b. Leather working techniques

3. Hunting/Tracking

a. Techniques used
b. Things to look for

4. Mining

a. Medieval Mining Techniques
b. Medieval prospecting techniques
c. Techniques used
d. Things to look for

5. Metalworking

a. Techniques for Smelting
b. Techniques for Casting

6. Jewelry Making

a. Techniques for Gem Cutting
b. Techniques for Goldsmithing
c. Techniques for Silversmithing

7. Medieval Painting

a. Materials Used
b. Paint Preparation

8. Medieval Cartography

a. Materials Used
b. Techniques Used

9. Architecture

a. Techniques Used
b. Medieval Styles/Materials used

10. Medieval Scrivening/Book Binding

a. Techniques for Book binding
b. Techniques for Paper Making
c. Materials used for Book binding

11. Medieval Farming Experience

a. Day-to-day activities
b. Tool used
c. Typical crops grown
d. Pests to look out for, common problems

12. Tailoring/Fiber making Experience

a. Medieval Thread making (Techniques, Materials)
b. Weaving (Techniques, Materials)
c. Sewing (Techniques, Materials)

13. Animal Training/Taming

a. Techniques for dealing with wild/unbroken animals
b. Training Techniques
c. Animal/Mount equipment

14. Medieval Martial Arts

a. European Martial Arts
b. Asian Martial Arts
c. African Martial Arts
d. South American Martial Arts
e. North American Martial Arts

15. Chemist

a. Ancient/historical chemistry

16. Linguist

17. Astrologer

a. Chart Reading
b. Star Motion Mapping

18. Religious Studies

a. Tao
b. Shinto
c. Zoroastrianism
d. Catholicism
e. Jainism

19. Economist

20. Lawyer/Legal Historian

21. Musician/Music Historian

22. Meteorology

If your skillset isn't listed above have no fear, more opportuinities may become availalble in other areas in the future.

Who is eligible?

To ensure we don't have a bunch of experts sitting around twiddling their thumbs, we'll be inviting our experts to apply in stages, based on the current project(s) the dev team is working on.

Initially, we'll be invitng Chemists, Farmers, Smiths, Linguists, and Tailors to apply to become our very first official SMEs.

Expectations, requirements and standards.

Now that you know what the SME program is about and what we're looking for, let's discuss a little more about how the program will work.

We have put together the SME Guidebook on all the things related to being a SME, expectations etc.

How do you apply?

Feel like you've got the right stuff?

If you have read the SME Guidebook, examined the requirements and expectations, and still feel you'd make a great candidate, go ahead and apply!

Click this link to view the SME application and Non-Disclosure Agreement.

Note: You'll need access to a printer and scanner in order to complete these steps.

Conclusion

If you have any questions about this program, please reply to this thread or email us at support@soulboundstudios.com.

We are excited to launch this as our third volunteer community program. With the SME program, we'll integrate your valuable and experienced feedback directly into Chronicles of Elyria.

Thanks for your interest!

Discuss

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Neiph - 6 days ago

Just wondering what qualifies as an expert. I bow hunt in real life, use different techniques to find where to hunt, and different techniques to track the animal after making the shot. I guess if it comes up I could help, but I imagine a lot of people have similar experience.

Jazz - 1 week ago

I have a question.

Why chemistry first?

There really is no such thing now that I've thought about it. I'm probably off by a good 200 or 300 years but The earliest I know of Chemistry is like the 1700's? Before then it was alchemy. If were basing Elyria off of the Iron age that's nearly a 2000 year difference? So, instead of looking for a chemist maybe look for an Alchemist or a substitute like a Wicca? A lot of Wicca practices are based of the ancient stuff. If you can find a some one that still practices Druidism that'd be great, maybe even find an Ovate.

Good Terms to look at:

  • Celtic Druids and Ovates (Still around but Rare)

  • Pagan Wicca (Tons around but you'd want an older one they're creepier and way better)

  • Egyptian Magi (I've never found one)

  • Chinese Qigong

  • Indian Rasayana

  • Native American Medicine Men

  • Hawaiian Elder

If you really want to Each Tribe could have its own version or practice. Since the live in different parts of the world they wouldn't have access to the same materials based on the biomes that they live in.. but that really depends on how in depth you want to go. I really want this to be a thing. I maybe able to name off enough to cover all that tribes...

A nice blend of astrology, "magic"(Wasn't actually magic) and Philosophy with influence from religion. So, if you want a system that is as genuine it should have a good mix of everything. You wouldn't want a Chemist from the start you'd be better off looking for a Botanist(Souzuo) and a Medieval history buff. They would establish a base line and define what materials are available. Then bringing on a chemist to consult where it can go from there. They would advise on what types of advancement can be brought about through the study of those materials.

I bounced around way to much on this I'm done.

HajimeSaito - 1 week ago
@Jazz:

Posted By Jazz at 09:39 AM - Mon May 14 2018

I have a question.

Why chemistry first?

There really is no such thing now that I've thought about it. I'm probably off by a good 200 or 300 years but The earliest I know of Chemistry is like the 1700's? Before then it was alchemy. If were basing Elyria off of the Iron age that's nearly a 2000 year difference? So, instead of looking for a chemist maybe look for an Alchemist or a substitute like a Wicca? A lot of Wicca practices are based of the ancient stuff. If you can find a some one that still practices Druidism that'd be great, maybe even find an Ovate.

Good Terms to look at:

  • Celtic Druids and Ovates (Still around but Rare)

  • Pagan Wicca (Tons around but you'd want an older one they're creepier and way better)

  • Egyptian Magi (I've never found one)

  • Chinese Qigong

  • Indian Rasayana

  • Native American Medicine Men

  • Hawaiian Elder

If you really want to Each Tribe could have its own version or practice. Since the live in different parts of the world they wouldn't have access to the same materials based on the biomes that they live in.. but that really depends on how in depth you want to go. I really want this to be a thing. I maybe able to name off enough to cover all that tribes...

A nice blend of astrology, "magic"(Wasn't actually magic) and Philosophy with influence from religion. So, if you want a system that is as genuine it should have a good mix of everything. You wouldn't want a Chemist from the start you'd be better off looking for a Botanist(Souzuo) and a Medieval history buff. They would establish a base line and define what materials are available. Then bringing on a chemist to consult where it can go from there. They would advise on what types of advancement can be brought about through the study of those materials.

I bounced around way to much on this I'm done.

Ok, where to begin?!?

Firstly, While the term Alchemy has been used broadly to describe various practices from multiple cultures, it was never witchcraft or magic, despite how it may have been perceived by the masses.

Generally speaking, when used to describe practices throughout Asia, the term "Alchemy" is really a misnomer as the Alchemical practices were more akin to Herbalism and healing.

The European style of Alchemy was more akin to Chemistry in its pursuit of transmutation and turning base metals such as lead in to gold. Although this may have seemed magical to the uneducated masses, it was nothing more than chemical reactions!!

The reason Asian style Alchemy has been lumped in with European Alchemy under the one "Alchemy" umbrella, is because they both shared the pursuit of the elixir of life/fountain of youth/immortality as well; however, this was not from a magical point of view as many would believe, it was from a healing/cure-all point of view. They kind of wanted to cure and eliminate ALL disease and hopefully obtain immortality as a result. Again, more pseudoscience than magic.

My opinion is that SBS desires a SME in Chemistry for 2 reasons.

1) Chemistry is science FACT with appropriate levels of study and qualification able to quantify an individuals level of expertise in the subject!! It is almost black and white. You either are or you aren't, although you may be close and considered acceptable in the absence of a genuine expert. Thus the "expert opinion" can be gauged according to its reliability.

Unfortunately, it is not as black and white or as easy to determine reliability with people from your suggested areas.

2) An SME in Chemistry is desired over your suggestions In order to maintain a certain level of realism since European Alchemy was the precursor to Chemistry. The difference between Alchemy and Chemistry being that Alchemists could only rely on observation using touch, sight, taste and smell (hearing?) in their Chemical experiments as they did not have the understanding of Chemistry, the periodic table, elements etc that we have today.

I would say many of the areas you suggest would be closer to Herbalism, but again (opinion, not fact) SBS wishes to be able to substantiate any claims through appropriate evidence where available, thus expert opinion from a similar profession which uses proper scientific method would be desirable as most from the list use anecdotal evidence which is unreliable...... but should not be dismissed entirely, until evidence can support or debunk claims definitively.

Cosmic Clouds - 8 hours ago
@HajimeSaito:

There is an extremely valuable point though, considering the vast differences from Tribe to Tribe and biome and much LARGER and diverse look at "chemistry" would be a lot more logical.. As far as the immersive factor SBS is looking for id imagine anways.

On that note, what would it look like to have someone such as an SME to actually put together a type of "Dictionary"? of Words from different tribes that essentially mean the same thing. Where as since there are different languages for each Tribe you could have a KEY word to pick up on. I don't speak any of the Tribe languages fluently.. so if im from another tribe and hear and or see another word I can say "okay they said Allkemic, they're talking about alchemy" and as was noted if each tribe has its own format of healer/chemist/preacher etc how in-depth are we looking? is it as far as.. healer/chemist/preacher monk/scientist/Lama shaman/alchemist/minister druid/botanist/cleric

These are probably bad examples but its 2am.. just wonder how complex its actually looking to get pushed.

Scylurus - 1 week ago
@Jazz:

Posted By Jazz at 03:39 AM - Mon May 14 2018

I have a question.

Why chemistry first?

Chemistry is the science behind chemical reactions. It doesn't matter what you call it, al-chemy, potioneering or even Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious... the science behind it doesn't change. I do believe that is important. As Markof said, chemistry is the language of matter.

I mean think of it this way; blackpowder is a chemical explosive made of sulfur, charcoal and saltpeter that was used for centuries prior to the establishment of formalized chemistry. Why it works can be explained by chemistry, how it works by chemistry. Would it be impossible to create blackpowder prior to the establishment of chemistry? No.

All of the others you've listed are, and I really don't mean to offend anyone, based more in belief than science, specifically in Earth beliefs. They reflect specific practices on earth, its cultural history and philosophical aspects that are a product of their time of creation. Which also means that most of them don't work... just because we used leeches for generations doesn't mean leeches are curealls.

Creating a system based on faulty information then asking an expert to see what could work seems... unrewarding, at least to me.

Luccheno - 1 week ago

Unfortunately work IRL won't let me go for the "Medieval Medicine/Diseases", as it takes up alot of time i currently do not have (can't even hang around the forum anymore).

But am curious to see how it goes, and will try to give my feedback on this area as stuff comes around ^^

CheshireGuevara - 1 week ago

I will definitely be applying for this.

Tin - 1 week ago

Don't mean to sound negative but... is this a sign of what's happening? If you're after qualified experts to have a profound impact on the game, shouldn't you be paying them rather than begging for free work? This seems like the typical "work for exposure" kind of thing artists experience all of the time. You wouldn't say to plumbers that you had a great idea for the pipework in your house so submit an application for the chance to do free work...

HajimeSaito - 1 week ago
@Tin:

Posted By Tin at 06:40 AM - Sun May 13 2018

Don't mean to sound negative but... is this a sign of what's happening? If you're after qualified experts to have a profound impact on the game, shouldn't you be paying them rather than begging for free work? This seems like the typical "work for exposure" kind of thing artists experience all of the time. You wouldn't say to plumbers that you had a great idea for the pipework in your house so submit an application for the chance to do free work...

Whats' wrong with asking if people are willing to help out with their expertise?

If the individual expert is willing to help by volunteering without pay for the benefit of the game, what's the harm?

If the individual expert does not want to volunteer and expects appropriate remuneration for their time, which is also fair, they don't have to apply!

It is their choice... It is their time... and surely what an individual does or doesn't do in their spare time is entirely up to them and really no business of anyone else?

So whats' the problem?

SBS is not forcing me to apply, but I will. SBS has made it clear I will not get paid, and I agree to those terms because I want to help the game be the best it can be, break new ground never before done, and if I can be apart of that, that is reward enough for me...

It's not about me, it's about the game!!!

VioletWinterlynn - 1 week ago
@Tin:

Posted By Tin at 4:40 PM - Sat May 12 2018

Don't mean to sound negative but... is this a sign of what's happening? If you're after qualified experts to have a profound impact on the game, shouldn't you be paying them rather than begging for free work? This seems like the typical "work for exposure" kind of thing artists experience all of the time. You wouldn't say to plumbers that you had a great idea for the pipework in your house so submit an application for the chance to do free work...

Posted By VioletWinterlynn at 12:15 AM - Thu May 10 2018

Posted By Sleazy at 11:53 PM - Wed May 09 2018

I'm sorry but this is just wrong. You're leaving out anyone with possible knowledge because you don't have time to filter out applications? What's the point of announcing it to the public then? Just hire historians. It just feels like an excuse to get free labour out of your consumers, which I'm not into.

Theyre looking for community volunteers that have that area of expertise to volunteer to help make those areas of the game as accurate as possible. Theyre not looking to hire knowledgeable people, instead theyre looking to get the community involved in the process of making the game.

Its not "free labour" theyre looking for, for say, theyre looking to involve the community in more that they can. If you'd prefer they left the community out and hired people and completely disregard the expertise that our community offers as a whole thats on you, but I completely disagree with that, and completely agree with what they are doing and involving the community.

Posted By Barleyman at 12:27 AM - Thu May 10 2018

Posted By Sleazy at 11:53 PM - Wed May 09 2018

I'm sorry but this is just wrong. You're leaving out anyone with possible knowledge because you don't have time to filter out applications? What's the point of announcing it to the public then? Just hire historians. It just feels like an excuse to get free labour out of your consumers, which I'm not into.

You're against people volunteering?

Isn't donating time to the game effectively the exact same thing as donating money?

SBS needs to save money AND make a great game. They have a huge community literally pouring money into the development all the time. Why would they not let people put time into it as well? It's the community's money and it's the community's time, if that's the way people want to use their time and money then SBS would be absolute fools not to let them.

Or, are you just salty because you don't have official credentials for the subject matter you want to talk about?

SBS is well within their rights to set whatever criteria they please on who they take on as volunteers. If you think sifting through applications is a pain, just try sifting through the myriads of contradicting opinions this community floats on every subject imaginable.

SBS needs a way to narrow the field and focus on the voices of people who definitely know what they're talking about. Since they A: don't know the subjects themselves and B: don't have the time, they can't exactly interview everyone that comes along. Official credentials like Degrees and other things are a reasonable requirement given the circumstances, despite the extensive knowledge which enthusiasts in the community might have.

Nobody is within their rights to complain that SBS isn't taking on enthusiasts as well as the credentialed experts. There are simply /way too many/ of you. I highly doubt they will ever take on any enthusiasts regardless of how knowledgeable they may or may not be. It's not a judgement on the expertise of those enthusiasts it's simply a reality of the studio's situation, they don't have time to listen to you.

Scylurus - 1 week ago

True chemistry is a young science. The techniques however aren't. It's why I said, 'what is possible with a given level of technology', that requires understanding of the historical technology as well as understanding of what you could do with that. CoE doesn't need to follow the pattern previously established by earth's development.

I'll give an example, not related to chemistry directly, but rather my own field, biology. So biology as a field can also be considered pretty young, and specifically microbiology was highly dependent on the development of the microscope. Without it observing the microcosm is out.

The biggest barrier to the development of the microscope was the lens, the rest isn't all that hard.

Now the microscope was developed by Antonie van Leuweenhoek in the 1670s, in that same time period Robert Hooke also developed a microscope. So it was sort of the culmination and confluence of technologies.

Now why is this important? Well without the microscope there'd be no proof for germ theory or cellular biology. Hypotheses about tiny 'miasma' or 'seeds of illness' or a dozen other names have always existed but a hypothesis requires proof. The microscope suddenly gave proof. There's a tiny world out there. But first you need a lens.

So let's look at the history of the lens and how it came about. In the 2nd century Ptolemy wrote a book titled Optics. With the fall of the Roman Empire the only surviving copies of this book and its knowledge were to be found in the Middle East, however by historical accounts the copies they had were incomplete and poorly translated.

On the basis of that knowledge in the 13th century in Northern Italy the first lenses were crafted. The knowledge then transferred to Northern Germany and the Netherlands and after centuries of perfecting it, lenses for proper spectacles, for telescopes and for microscopes were made.

Ok so let's hypothesize - what if the knowledge contained in the book Optics hadn't been mostly lost. What if that knowledge had continued to grow and evolve. In the centuries that are sometimes known as the 'Dark Ages', what if they had continued to experiment and innovate? Suddenly it's hypothetically plausible to have microscopes and telescopes coupled with knights in chain mail. :D

Now why did I choose this example? Well, it's a good one of how one bit of knowledge could change the world. How we need to know what is required in our own fields, how the tools we as scientists use came to be.

Also since Astronomy is a thing, telescopes are important so lenses are important.

Plus I personally think that if there's any form of controlled biological warfare, you need microscopes in CoE and since the Dras are the experts in that, I personally think they can't do without one and a significant understanding of germ theory. :D

Basically, don't get too caught up in what actually happened, consider what could be possible with that level of knowledge. It's still a fantasy game.

markof - 1 week ago

chemistry is a tricky one because as a science chemistry is really young. But chemistry is, as one of my teachers loved to tell us, the language in which the world is written, chemistry is the language of the matter.

One of the beauty of that language is that you do not need to understand it to speak it. To keep on the metaphor, understanding the language is modern chemistry science, reading the language would be the ability to extract elements from more complex compounds and writing would be the ability to combine elements to produce more complex compounds.

if we consider Alchemy as an older form of chemistry, the question will be what do SBS want to do with it? the techniques used for extracting elements from complex compounds have not changed that much (the matter has not changed) only the tools have changed, same can be said about combining elements. Lots of those techniques are used by other crafts do achieve the same results.

Distillation is a good example, distillation is one of the techniques used to separate liquid elements , the exact same concept of the technique is used by brewers, perfume makers, i'd say herbalists and alchemists to only name a few. The base tool is an Alembic and the process is to use it to boil the complex liquid and condensate the expected element, actually extracting it from the original compound.

The question would be of what skill is distillation a technique ? or is it part of several skills ? can an alchemist or a perfume maker that knows how to use distillation can apply it into a brewing crafting, even if it does know know it from brewing ?

The Zectorian - 1 week ago

I am no expert on Economics, however, I do understand that many business practices that are important factors in economies today are based on modern business and economic theory and so would not have been present in medieval times. I would ask the devs keep in mind that many economists won't be thinking about that when they talk about economic models and theories. I would recommend a "bare-bones" understanding so that you can separate out what about economics the result of modern day practice in markets and what is not. Ultimately economics is determined by how people make choices of need and desire so it will be rooted in your AI's behavior.

fireraizer200 - 1 week ago

Since the list is not exhaustive, would Soul Bound Studios be interested in help with stone tool technology? I know there is a plan to increase technological complexity throughout the game's time; however, I am unsure exactly what technology each tribe will have. Stone tools and weapons could still be useful even if tribes start with iron age knowledge. I am about to graduate tomorrow with a BA in Anthropology, the first step toward Archaeology in the United States, and I have some experience creating stone tools for an experimental archaeology paper I drafted. While my focus in coursework has been on Native American populations, my knowledge of flint-knapping. or stone tool crafting, includes the techniques used by virtually all stone working populations. If the studio is interested, I would be happy to help when I am able to do so.

gtox - 1 week ago
@fireraizer200:

Even when technology expands beyond stone tools, that knowledge can still be useful for people who find themselves out in the field without the necessary tool or the means to acquire an advanced version of that tool in a timely manner.

fireraizer200 - 1 week ago
@gtox:

Posted By gtox at 11:46 AM - Fri May 11 2018

Even when technology expands beyond stone tools, that knowledge can still be useful for people who find themselves out in the field without the necessary tool or the means to acquire an advanced version of that tool in a timely manner.

I agree. Expedient stone tools can be very useful in the field when access to advanced tools is limited. When you know how to work with stone the process is not very time consuming.

Huntsmaster - 1 week ago

Fair enough!

Xonth - 1 week ago

Aannnnnd I do not know any of those...

Maulvorn - 1 week ago

I'll be signing up!

Jongatown - 1 week ago

Please get two opinions on everything to come from this. I can just see some troll "subject expert" trying to derail what you want to do here just to be a dick...

HajimeSaito - 1 week ago
@Jongatown:

Posted By Jongatown at 04:28 AM - Fri May 11 2018

Please get two opinions on everything to come from this. I can just see some troll "subject expert" trying to derail what you want to do here just to be a dick...

If SBS is going to rely solely on expert opinion, then it would be better to have 3 experts to avoid a deadlock.

But this is easily avoided by making it a requirement to support the experts opinion in proper evidence from literature

Illuminati - 1 week ago
@HajimeSaito:

Posted By HajimeSaito at 7:00 PM - Thu May 10 2018

Posted By Jongatown at 04:28 AM - Fri May 11 2018

Please get two opinions on everything to come from this. I can just see some troll "subject expert" trying to derail what you want to do here just to be a dick...

If SBS is going to rely solely on expert opinion, then it would be better to have 3 experts to avoid a deadlock.

But this is easily avoided by making it a requirement to support the experts opinion in proper evidence from literature

Yes, this. Haji, I'm rusty with all that chemistry too. They're is no way I could look at a monograph and tell you if the drug will pass into the urine or not, but both of is know it's a consideration and could puzzle out the answer (unless you remember your medchem). Our strength is knowing there is something to know about, and having the skills to get the answer ;)

HajimeSaito - 1 week ago
@Illuminati:

Posted By Illuminati at 08:27 AM - Fri May 11 2018

Posted By HajimeSaito at 7:00 PM - Thu May 10 2018

Posted By Jongatown at 04:28 AM - Fri May 11 2018

Please get two opinions on everything to come from this. I can just see some troll "subject expert" trying to derail what you want to do here just to be a dick...

If SBS is going to rely solely on expert opinion, then it would be better to have 3 experts to avoid a deadlock.

But this is easily avoided by making it a requirement to support the experts opinion in proper evidence from literature

Yes, this. Haji, I'm rusty with all that chemistry too. They're is no way I could look at a monograph and tell you if the drug will pass into the urine or not, but both of is know it's a consideration and could puzzle out the answer (unless you remember your medchem). Our strength is knowing there is something to know about, and having the skills to get the answer ;)

Are we talking chemistry or pharmacology/physiology? I am confused! it happens in old age :P

If you mean looking at a chemical structure and saying, "yep, he'd pee that one out for sure", then I don't think anyone can do that, and you might be looking at the wrong source for that information.

it could just be able to remember certain things or types of information that others do not, just like others will no doubt remember things that I don't. Physical properties like solubility... yeah I look that up, unless it's something like sulfur, then all I remember is f**k it, use alcohol to aid solubility because it is a bitch to get in to solution.

But pharmacology, physiology, and clinical information including ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) are things I know well, so will often know this off the top of my head (but I've also done many more years of extra qualifications and credentialing). I'm just shit at organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry and structure activity relationships these days.....

anyway.

If you mean a drug monograph, such as from the manufacturer, I am also confused because every drug monograph that I have seen supplied from the manufacturer in AUS has that information, but I am not sure about other countries.

While I remember the route of elimination for most drugs, where is it clinical important, ie, predominantly or solely either renally excreted or hepatically metabolised (becomes less important when elimination occurs via multiple pathways), I can always double check in any number of clinical resources either in the primary literature or other databases which provide appropriate references.

You're right, it is impossible for 1 person to know everything and apart of the job is knowing where to find the information, but I guess I focused on that kind of information as it was necessary for my job in hospital as I couldn't be looking all that information up constantly.

Illuminati - 1 week ago
@HajimeSaito:

Posted By HajimeSaito at 9:08 PM - Thu May 10 2018

Posted By Illuminati at 08:27 AM - Fri May 11 2018

Posted By HajimeSaito at 7:00 PM - Thu May 10 2018

Posted By Jongatown at 04:28 AM - Fri May 11 2018

Please get two opinions on everything to come from this. I can just see some troll "subject expert" trying to derail what you want to do here just to be a dick...

If SBS is going to rely solely on expert opinion, then it would be better to have 3 experts to avoid a deadlock.

But this is easily avoided by making it a requirement to support the experts opinion in proper evidence from literature

Yes, this. Haji, I'm rusty with all that chemistry too. They're is no way I could look at a monograph and tell you if the drug will pass into the urine or not, but both of is know it's a consideration and could puzzle out the answer (unless you remember your medchem). Our strength is knowing there is something to know about, and having the skills to get the answer ;)

Are we talking chemistry or pharmacology/physiology? I am confused! it happens in old age :P

If you mean looking at a chemical structure and saying, "yep, he'd pee that one out for sure", then I don't think anyone can do that, and you might be looking at the wrong source for that information.

it could just be able to remember certain things or types of information that others do not, just like others will no doubt remember things that I don't. Physical properties like solubility... yeah I look that up, unless it's something like sulfur, then all I remember is f**k it, use alcohol to aid solubility because it is a bitch to get in to solution.

But pharmacology, physiology, and clinical information including ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) are things I know well, so will often know this off the top of my head (but I've also done many more years of extra qualifications and credentialing). I'm just shit at organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry and structure activity relationships these days.....

anyway.

If you mean a drug monograph, such as from the manufacturer, I am also confused because every drug monograph that I have seen supplied from the manufacturer in AUS has that information, but I am not sure about other countries.

While I remember the route of elimination for most drugs, where is it clinical important, ie, predominantly or solely either renally excreted or hepatically metabolised (becomes less important when elimination occurs via multiple pathways), I can always double check in any number of clinical resources either in the primary literature or other databases which provide appropriate references.

You're right, it is impossible for 1 person to know everything and apart of the job is knowing where to find the information, but I guess I focused on that kind of information as it was necessary for my job in hospital as I couldn't be looking all that information up constantly.

Nah, I just remember in medchem looking at drug structures. Determining if they were polar/watersoluble, and determining if they would likely be excreted in urine or something. Nothing practical, just concept work. Been a long time for me and i maybe remembering wrong.

Huntsmaster - 1 week ago
@HajimeSaito:

Posted By HajimeSaito at 4:00 PM - Thu May 10 2018

But this is easily avoided by making it a requirement to support the experts opinion in proper evidence from literature

Two impertinent questions:
1) What makes literature "proper evidence", and not just another competing opinion?
2) What do you do if there's no proper evidence in the literature?

HajimeSaito - 1 week ago
@Huntsmaster:

Posted By Huntsmaster at 08:10 AM - Fri May 11 2018

Posted By HajimeSaito at 4:00 PM - Thu May 10 2018

But this is easily avoided by making it a requirement to support the experts opinion in proper evidence from literature

Two impertinent questions:
1) What makes literature "proper evidence", and not just another competing opinion?
2) What do you do if there's no proper evidence in the literature?

You misunderstand, I am not actually saying that ALL primary literature is "proper evidence". There is a tonne of BS in primary literature too, When you get good quality primary literature, then it is "proper" and the fact that it is primary literature then makes it of the highest quality evidence..

You need to be able to critically appraise the article in question..

If there is no proper evidence in the primary literature, then it comes down to expert opinion and is where either 1 or 3 experts are better because you need a majority consensus. An even number could result in a deadlock

Bombastus - 1 week ago

I am not certain this applies across the board, but it is almost impossible to be an expert in a field and not have some notion of the foundations and history of that field. For example, I hold a Bachelor of Fine Art. A big part of that degree involved understanding the evolution of materials and techniques throughout art history. I know exactly what paint was made of in any given era, and the weaknesses and strengths of each. I imagine engineering or chemistry would be similar. You need to know the origin and workings of simple machines, or the early practices and mistakes of chemistry pioneers in order to be informed in a modern context.

MCorvinus - 1 week ago
@Bombastus:

I can definitely testify that this is true in mathematics. Even if you don't know the exact time period or year of specific mathematical advances, going through a good undergraduate curriculum would give you a good enough intuition into the general timeline of the subject. Everyone tends to learn a bit of math history through general anecdotes and flavor added to lectures.

Gromschlog - 1 week ago
@Bombastus:

Posted By Bombastus at 9:54 PM - Thu May 10 2018

I am not certain this applies across the board, but it is almost impossible to be an expert in a field and not have some notion of the foundations and history of that field. For example, I hold a Bachelor of Fine Art. A big part of that degree involved understanding the evolution of materials and techniques throughout art history. I know exactly what paint was made of in any given era, and the weaknesses and strengths of each. I imagine engineering or chemistry would be similar. You need to know the origin and workings of simple machines, or the early practices and mistakes of chemistry pioneers in order to be informed in a modern context.

Well... actually... there were no chemistry history lectures in my ten years of studying chemistry. Sure, sometimes, one or the other professor started his lecture with an old quote... but that never went deep enough to know anything about chemistry more than 200 years ago that would be good enough to base game mechanics on. Or, if you want to call it otherwise: the usual view on chemistry is, that its basements are just 200 years old and thats why most dont look at what happened before in their studies. Having a high degree in chemistry is mostly about knowing how to deal with a problem and knowing many currently used mechanics. Knowing alchemy isnt really a part of it. its much more about trying to understand how the world works than about knowing what people long time ago were able to do. So the big question is: do they look for a historian that researched about what chemists did in medieval times (thats what I would do if I were them) or do they really look for a chemist that can tell how things work and may think about how things might work, if he had other mechanics to use than what he currently does (thats what i might be able to try)?

and anyway... a big part of studying anything is learning to know what you dont know ;)

Its like if you want to be a chemistry patent lawyer, its easier to be chemist and understand everything in the patent and spend a year or two learning about laws than knowing about how laws work and having to learn the understanding of chemistry in the patents. Thats why most patent lawyers studied science and not law.

Scylurus - 1 week ago

On the topic of chemistry, honestly one of the main things in historical chemistry is simply 'What is possible' with that level of technology, rather than just what we have evidence for.

For example, look up the Baghdad Battery, for an example of an ancient galvanic cell, at least that's one hypothesis.

If you're interested you might also want to look up Jabir ibn Hayyan, latinized to Geber, a 10th century chemist who is sometimes known as the Father of Chemistry. Some fascinating stuff he did; crystallization processes, written recipes for acid production etc.

Huntsmaster - 1 week ago
@Scylurus:

Posted By Scylurus at 10:04 AM - Thu May 10 2018

On the topic of chemistry, honestly one of the main things in historical chemistry is simply 'What is possible' with that level of technology, rather than just what we have evidence for.

Yep, and that's a perspective that is difficult for a historian or a hobbyist to provide. Sometimes, we're missing evidence of a technology because archaeologists simply don't recognize the possibility of its existence.

Jabir is a fascinating figure. I think there's some debate on whether his works were his alone or the product of a school of alchemy (or whether he existed at all). I've read some of the works attributed to him, and performed some of the chemistry described. It's a lot of fun seeing science through the eyes of our ancestors!

Gromschlog - 1 week ago

Chemist sounds weird somehow... modern chemistry is only roughly 200 years old and before that, nothing was really organized... so what is it, that you want from a chemist? an overview over what medieval alchemists tried to achieve? A list of know elements and ways to combine them? I guess, we will only have inorganic chemistry in CoE, right? So, will the chemist in CoE be part of material research for poisons, blacksmiths and structure-building? Or in which direction will it go? Chemistry is a huge field... I intend to get my doctorate in inorganic chemistry (high pressure stuff) in the end of this year... but I never really looked deeper into history or what those guys hundreds of years back did... just would like to know whats needed before I might apply...

Mhaura - 1 week ago

I hope I'm able to contribute what the devs need... maybe I'll sign up. I don't see anyone posting here with a degree in clothing/textile design.

Xeyska - 1 week ago
@Mhaura:

Posted By Mhaura at 02:41 AM - Thu May 10 2018

I hope I'm able to contribute what the devs need... maybe I'll sign up. I don't see anyone posting here with a degree in clothing/textile design.

While SBS might not be activately looking for people who are in your field, it doesn't hurt to send your application in early for when the developers are ready to accept them. You would be "in the system" so to speak, and might have less of a delay for them to get a hold of you. Just something to consider. :)

Atlas Forgiven - 1 week ago
@Xeyska:

Posted By Xeyska at 06:08 AM - Thu May 10 2018

Posted By Mhaura at 02:41 AM - Thu May 10 2018

I hope I'm able to contribute what the devs need... maybe I'll sign up. I don't see anyone posting here with a degree in clothing/textile design.

While SBS might not be activately looking for people who are in your field, it doesn't hurt to send your application in early for when the developers are ready to accept them. You would be "in the system" so to speak, and might have less of a delay for them to get a hold of you. Just something to consider. :)

I think they'd prefer we wait to send them in. No reason to bog them down with applications on subjects they arnt ready for. Sure they said they would take them and theyed be filtered to the back of the pile but even filtering them takes time and resources I assume?

Mhaura - 1 week ago
@Atlas Forgiven :

Posted By *Atlas Forgiven * at 06:50 AM - Thu May 10 2018

I think they'd prefer we wait to send them in. No reason to bog them down with applications on subjects they arnt ready for.

The post said the first 5 subject experts they're going to be inviting first are Chemists, Farmers, Smiths, Linguists, and Tailors. Clothing/textile design is a tailor.

Are those in a specific order or are they taking applications for 5 subjects at a time?

Sleazy - 1 week ago

I'm sorry but this is just wrong. You're leaving out anyone with possible knowledge because you don't have time to filter out applications? What's the point of announcing it to the public then? Just hire historians. It just feels like an excuse to get free labour out of your consumers, which I'm not into.

Leiywen - 1 week ago
@Sleazy:

Posted By Sleazy at 07:53 AM - Thu May 10 2018

I'm sorry but this is just wrong. You're leaving out anyone with possible knowledge because you don't have time to filter out applications? What's the point of announcing it to the public then? Just hire historians. It just feels like an excuse to get free labour out of your consumers, which I'm not into.

You have to draw a line somewhere.

But I wonder if a degree in industrial engineering (CQ pretty much supply chain logistics/economics) would be accepted for the economics matter.

Barleyman - 1 week ago
@Sleazy:

Posted By Sleazy at 11:53 PM - Wed May 09 2018

I'm sorry but this is just wrong. You're leaving out anyone with possible knowledge because you don't have time to filter out applications? What's the point of announcing it to the public then? Just hire historians. It just feels like an excuse to get free labour out of your consumers, which I'm not into.

You're against people volunteering?

Isn't donating time to the game effectively the exact same thing as donating money?

SBS needs to save money AND make a great game. They have a huge community literally pouring money into the development all the time. Why would they not let people put time into it as well? It's the community's money and it's the community's time, if that's the way people want to use their time and money then SBS would be absolute fools not to let them.

Or, are you just salty because you don't have official credentials for the subject matter you want to talk about?

SBS is well within their rights to set whatever criteria they please on who they take on as volunteers. If you think sifting through applications is a pain, just try sifting through the myriads of contradicting opinions this community floats on every subject imaginable.

SBS needs a way to narrow the field and focus on the voices of people who definitely know what they're talking about. Since they A: don't know the subjects themselves and B: don't have the time, they can't exactly interview everyone that comes along. Official credentials like Degrees and other things are a reasonable requirement given the circumstances, despite the extensive knowledge which enthusiasts in the community might have.

Nobody is within their rights to complain that SBS isn't taking on enthusiasts as well as the credentialed experts. There are simply /way too many/ of you. I highly doubt they will ever take on any enthusiasts regardless of how knowledgeable they may or may not be. It's not a judgement on the expertise of those enthusiasts it's simply a reality of the studio's situation, they don't have time to listen to you.

VioletWinterlynn - 1 week ago
@Sleazy:

Posted By Sleazy at 11:53 PM - Wed May 09 2018

I'm sorry but this is just wrong. You're leaving out anyone with possible knowledge because you don't have time to filter out applications? What's the point of announcing it to the public then? Just hire historians. It just feels like an excuse to get free labour out of your consumers, which I'm not into.

Theyre looking for community volunteers that have that area of expertise to volunteer to help make those areas of the game as accurate as possible. Theyre not looking to hire knowledgeable people, instead theyre looking to get the community involved in the process of making the game.

Its not "free labour" theyre looking for, for say, theyre looking to involve the community in more that they can. If you'd prefer they left the community out and hired people and completely disregard the expertise that our community offers as a whole thats on you, but I completely disagree with that, and completely agree with what they are doing and involving the community.

Poldano - 1 week ago

As for those who called attention to the fact that some required knowledge doesn't come with degrees or certificates, SBS will figure that out soon enough. Their problem is separating all the wannabe experts (like me) from people who really know stuff and know how to do stuff, and documentation is a first cut at doing so. Eventually, they may need to solicit multiple opinions on some subjects, because disagreements among experts are quite common.

Gaiyamato - 1 week ago

I have an Associate Diploma in History I completed some ten years ago, sadly was not focused in any specific area at all, and I am an amateur enthusiast who collects books (almost always reprints or modern collections of letters etc.) from the late middle ages through to the middle 19th century as a hobby. I have also worked with medieval guilds/societies/groups in the past for battle and "cosplay" reenactments etc.

I enjoy focusing on dead languages and cultures and "melting-pot" cultures and how they came about. I am by absolutely no means an expert on anything in any of these fields, and I do not fit any of your criteria.

However much of these fields rely on amateur experts as they do not have any specific focus unless a post graduate gains funding for their own private research into such. Even then I have provided material and verbal opinions on papers regarding some of this work - such as the effect of importation and crossbreeding of Chinese "Hexi" Goats (actually their ancestor breed) for fine wool production in the Tatar region during Ottoman and Russian occupation periods and it's effects on the economics of wool production in Turkey, and on modern descendant breeds, during the 16th and 17th centuries - something which only the nerdiest of amateur nerds would even bother trying to learn about.

I also have university minors in plant science and neurology (Computer Science major), all entirely a modern focus within those fields so do not meet your requirements, however I use a lot of that background in my spare time to learn about environmental and human population interactions in history (I used to work making computer models for scientific use on some of these topics also before becoming a stay at home dad). again for example the effects on pepper cultivation and changes in agricultural practices in Eastern India and the effects that had on gut bacteria and human behaviour over time (still a completely under-researched area).

I am also into religions on an amateur level, having studied a broad focus on Theology under the Melbourne Archdioceses (via Uniting Church of Tasmania), including Catholicism, Orthodoxy sects, Sunni and Shi'a Islam (including the Druze and Yazidi faiths), here in Australia in the early 90s (years 11 and 12) for 2 years, and I am a huge nerd fanboy of Tengrism - which I feel you have left off your list there most unfortunately given it's huge impact on Eastern, Central Asia and the Tartar regions (Including Georgia up through Crimea and into Khazak region), including on Turkish, Bulgarian and Hungarian culture. Again though, I have no formal qualifications in any of that beyond an Australian college level.

You might find that gathering your core experts, but then forming advisory panels of "lesser"/"amateur" people such as myself, and many others commenting here, might allow you to gain a slightly more accurate picture.

Often even experts do not agree on many of the details from the middle ages, as the further back you go the patchier evidence becomes. It really is good to seek out a wide array of sources on many of these topics from very well read people. I am sure the experts you eventually pick - all intelligent and well learned people no doubt - will tell you the same thing. It can often be difficult to say for sure how a specific thing was done, or how a specific population behaved, and the specifics could vary a lot by both region and which date within the middle ages is being discussed.

I feel like you have opened an enormous can of worms here. ^_^

Either way I am thoroughly looking forward to playing within a game that takes this much time and care to understand the material as best it can! I seriously wish you the best of luck!! <3

Klorinth - 1 week ago

Firstly I am very happy to see you crowdsourcing expertise from the community. Thank you for involving all of us so much in the creation of this wonderful game. We appreciate it.

I regrettably am concerned about the use of certain “official” qualifications for some of the subject areas. Multiple of them do not have degrees or certifications of any sort. And for some the ones you can find are for the wrong subject matter... such as the chemist comments above, hunting, bushcraft, tanning, etc.

My favourite subject is farming. Having a modern degree in agriculture does not qualify you as an expert in medieval farming. In some ways it may actually disqualify you. Modern agriculture has almost nothing to do with historical farming. Most modern farmers are dependent on pesticide, herbicide, and fertilizer... none of which existed in the past. You need to find people that know how to farm on the small scale with nothing but hand tools and natural materials.

I understand the difficulty of screening applications, I do the same thing in my work. Just don’t exclude people that truly are knowledgeable just to go with a degree. I have turned down many applications from people with a PhD and hired the person with a bachelors degree instead. That piece of paper does not mean they are the right one for the job. Crafts people and farmers don’t tend to have degrees. They are the experts though.

I would love to offer my knowledge of sheep and grazing, but that is not what my post secondary education is in.

Gaiyamato - 1 week ago
@Klorinth:

Posted By Klorinth at 1:07 PM - Thu May 10 2018

Firstly I am very happy to see you crowdsourcing expertise from the community. Thank you for involving all of us so much in the creation of this wonderful game. We appreciate it.

I regrettably am concerned about the use of certain “official” qualifications for some of the subject areas. Multiple of them do not have degrees or certifications of any sort. And for some the ones you can find are for the wrong subject matter... such as the chemist comments above, hunting, bushcraft, tanning, etc.

My favourite subject is farming. Having a modern degree in agriculture does not qualify you as an expert in medieval farming. In some ways it may actually disqualify you. Modern agriculture has almost nothing to do with historical farming. Most modern farmers are dependent on pesticide, herbicide, and fertilizer... none of which existed in the past. You need to find people that know how to farm on the small scale with nothing but hand tools and natural materials.

I understand the difficulty of screening applications, I do the same thing in my work. Just don’t exclude people that truly are knowledgeable just to go with a degree. I have turned down many applications from people with a PhD and hired the person with a bachelors degree instead. That piece of paper does not mean they are the right one for the job. Crafts people and farmers don’t tend to have degrees. They are the experts though.

I would love to offer my knowledge of sheep and grazing, but that is not what my post secondary education is in.

Exactly. I know a guy with a maths degree down here not far from where I live who makes replica medieval wooden sailing vessels based on historical sketches and sails them up and down the Derwent river. The armour-smith south of here who makes late medieval mail has a bachelors degree in fine arts, but his work sells all over the world as authentic re-productions.

These are such niche topics it is going to be extremely difficult to find experts with the requirements they have set I feel.

nail eisen horn - 1 week ago

How am I to prove that I'm a expert Hunter. I was hunting by myself at age 12.

Illuminati - 1 week ago

I wonder if being a PharmD qualifies for chemist. Took a ton of chemistry, but thays not what the degree is for :)

Poldano - 1 week ago
@Illuminati:

Posted By Illuminati at 6:45 PM - Wed May 09 2018

I wonder if being a PharmD qualifies for chemist. Took a ton of chemistry, but thays not what the degree is for :)

Go for it. If someone better does not come along, you will be the best we have.

I think there will be a need for pharmacology expertise as well. An American-style chemist doesn't generally know anything about dosages. A British-style chemist, the kind that works in a chemist's shop, is a pharmacologist, I gather.

HajimeSaito - 1 week ago
@Poldano:

Posted By Illuminati at 6:45 PM - Wed May 09 2018

I wonder if being a PharmD qualifies for chemist. Took a ton of chemistry, but thays not what the degree is for :)

Posted By Sheppard at 05:59 AM - Thu May 10 2018

I'm curious about the chemist. I have never met a historical chemist, might be a history person instead of an actual chemist. (Masters student in chemistry here -BS in biochem going for MS in Pchem, hopefully going for PhD cause I want to be a professor)

As a similarly qualified individual I can certainly understand your desire to apply for it, but I feel that Sheppard is more of the chemistry expert.

I'm not 100% familiar with the full scope of a PharmD, so you may be in better standing than myself, but as much as I would love to help on this topic, my qualifications are more clinically focused with pharmaceutical chemistry, medicinal chemistry and biochemistry, but little to no organic, inorganic or analytical chemistry (sure I did some, a long time ago, but it hardly gets used, the cogs are rusty and the notes have faded considerably)

I guess it depends on how many sme's SBS wish to assign to a given area. Pharmaceutical chemistry medicinal chemistry and biochemistry, sure, but it has been a very long time since I have done any organic, inorganic or analytical chemistry to consider myself an expert.

HajimeSaito - 1 week ago
@Poldano:

Posted By Poldano at 1:41 PM - Thu May 10 2018

Posted By Illuminati at 6:45 PM - Wed May 09 2018

I wonder if being a PharmD qualifies for chemist. Took a ton of chemistry, but thays not what the degree is for :)

Go for it. If someone better does not come along, you will be the best we have.

I think there will be a need for pharmacology expertise as well. An American-style chemist doesn't generally know anything about dosages. A British-style chemist, the kind that works in a chemist's shop, is a pharmacologist, I gather.

While I can't speak for the British award/qualification, I just wanted to clarify that a pharmacist works in a pharmacy/chemist shop (or hospital and other places) and is a medical scientist/healthcare professional, while a pharmacologist is more of a research scientist/academic.

There are similarities but some distinct differences.

Takeda_Shinukage - 1 week ago

I'm kinda curious to what certification an "expert hunter" is given. Is that actually a degree now?

Kuraruku - 1 week ago
@Takeda_Shinukage:

right? Hunting and trapping only require experience and a license for the state you hunt and trap in. Unless your some survivalist expert a la Bear Grills or Survivor Man , or an instructor that is state certified you wont have any real way to prove your skills in such things. Hunting is definitely a learn by experience thing that a state license to hunt doesn't mean anything other than you know the laws about hunting.

Fergus Redbeard - 1 week ago

Waiting for mental and behavioral disorders make the list....

Probably not :)

This is cool! Hope you find some qualified people!

Expectorate - 1 week ago

I really hope you guys get experts with practical knowledge of their areas of expertise, rather than pure academics that would argue technique until they're blue in the face, and then be utterly unable to replicate those techniques.

I know someone who's area of expertise is medieval carpentry and joinery. He restores and repairs furniture for the Abbey Museum in Caboolture(QLD Australia). I won't use the term Expert, as I don't think he'd like that word much, or Master Carpenter, as he's had apprentices before that have hung up their shingles as 'Master Carpenters' and done rubbish work, usually resorting to power tools. Basically, I think the title 'Master' of anything is like sainthood to him - you have to have worked on something for most of your life and probably be dead to have earned it.

People like that, dedicated to their craft, would absolutely have the kind of information that would not only give Elyria's crafting system a greater sense of verisimilitude, but make it more fun for the dedicated crafters in-game.

My question is, how the heck are you going to get actual experts out of their workshops/classes etc and feeding you the information you need to revolutionise crafting in online games?

Huntsmaster - 1 week ago

Neat.

bekabo - 1 week ago

I'm just putting this out there that I am no expert on the subject but I wonder if while exploring the medieval,middle ages time period in the continent's listed if an exploration of ocenania Polynesian cultures for example Maori culture in new zealand before European settlers came may provide some ideas and examples for the game. Some examples being their use of various plants (found only this area at the time) for medicinal purposes, some unique cooking techniques such and the hangi (cooking using heated rocks in a oven put) not to mention some of the unique jewellery created from bird/whale/fish bones and stones/shells such as the Paua shell (note these are Maori examples and other Polynesian cultures will have their own examples). Just some food for thought.

Sage_Alluvial - 1 week ago

I just want to confirm; in some places, it says to wait until what you are applying for is open, in others it says to just go ahead and apply.

Which one is correct? :)

Serpentius - 1 week ago
@Sage_Alluvial:

Posted By Sage_Alluvial at 4:31 PM - Wed May 09 2018

I just want to confirm; in some places, it says to wait until what you are applying for is open, in others it says to just go ahead and apply.

Which one is correct? :)

Right now, we are only really going to evaluate and move forward on the 5 areas we specified in the announcement post.

If you submit for the other areas, you will get a reply, but you will be waiting longer as we're not ready to engage with you at the present time.

kajoreh - 1 week ago

While I wish I could be considered an expert in some of these areas, I'm more of a jack of all trades kind of guy. I do want to applaud the dev team for seeking these people out in this manner. Intellectual crowdsourcing. Brilliant. What a great way to outsource the knowledge needed to make this game as accurate as it can be without sacrificing "gameplayability". This kills two birds with one stone.
First he company spend less of it's limited monetary resources. And secondly, they can stay focused on what they are "experts" at, which is developing this kick-ass game. I'm sure there will be a very deep pool of individuals that will be able to step up to the plate and lend a hand.

Xerr - 1 week ago

I wanted to post this here since I asked this on discord and was given the yes. If you have a document like DD214 that shows your MOS in the military (for those that apply) that can be used as well. Obviously just remove information like social security from it. (don't black out, cut it out and then fill with black, blacked out areas can be photoshopped to be legible)

Example- I worked with gold alloys and did lost wax castings etc. MOS 4Y0X2

Mankar_Verizan - 1 week ago

As a second year student of history i am standing at your disposal. Although i am unsure as i am just second year student but i do have a quite extensive knowledge of medieval times especially considering warfare, medieval defense architecture and pirate traditions of the Adriatic sea

Jouten - 1 week ago

What's going to be funny are the "experts" on European Combat. People are still fighting over what the manuscripts are trying to say. Most of the "Paired Technique" drills performed at tournaments are really there to show another interpretation and because the judges are legit curious on how they're presented depending on the context.

A quote from Matt Galas, someone who a lot of folks would legit call an expert due to the amount of time he's spent learning this stuff said:

"What makes HEMA unique among martial arts is that it is essentially anarchic in nature. It has no established hierarchy, no masters, no recognized rank structure, and no universally accepted technical interpretations. This, plus the ambiguous nature of much of our primary source material, makes the practice of HEMA essentially an extended Socratic dialogue which takes place in both the real and online worlds. Ideally, the goal of that dialogue is to increase our understanding, rather than to "win" an argument - though human nature generally undermines that ideal....

...Critical thinking and open-minded examination (and re-examination) of the sources are the foundation of HEMA. That approach has enabled huge leaps and bounds in our understanding of our primary source material. Maintaining that approach is critical to the continued success and positive future growth of HEMA."

So...to sum it up, you're going to have the European Martial Arts guys bicker among themselves.... Can't wait :P

Mankar_Verizan - 1 week ago
@Jouten:

All hell is going to brake loose especially between archaeologists and historians

Sheppard - 1 week ago

I'm curious about the chemist. I have never met a historical chemist, might be a history person instead of an actual chemist. (Masters student in chemistry here -BS in biochem going for MS in Pchem, hopefully going for PhD cause I want to be a professor)

Serpentius - 1 week ago

Someone asked if they could use a high quality mobile photo in lieu of something scanned, and my response is absolutely yes, as long as it is very legible.

KearaLoar - 1 week ago

When I first heard of the SME program I'd hoped I would be able to use it to help the staff in some way (beyond shelving out cash), but I'm no expert in any of the requested fields. Alas. Just a medieval-esque enthusiast =).

Snipperhoofd - 1 week ago

Ecology is not on the list of areas of expertise, nor do I expect it to be added after seeing this list (since it won't be a job in CoE). However, could SbS still use someone with extensive knowledge on this matter?

chipla - 1 week ago

By Legal Historian I assume you mean someone who studied the history of contracts rather than someone who did Criminology correct?

Serpentius - 1 week ago
@chipla:

Posted By chipla at 2:01 PM - Wed May 09 2018

By Legal Historian I assume you mean someone who studied the history of contracts rather than someone who did Criminology correct?

From Snipehunter: Correct, although long-term we'll need both.

Serpentius - 1 week ago

Honestly we just don't have a big enough team to support and filter through 1000 applications, which is why we had to make the bar reasonably high for admittance. We hope you can be understanding that it is more of a resource issue and less of a desire to not be flexible.

Additionally, per SnipeHunter, in regards to medieval martial arts and the like, given the esoteric nature of the knowledge, I think we can stretch to accept things like dojo recognition, FEMA titles/ranks, SCA peerage, etc. as certification, but we'd prefer a professor with a background in martial history over a recreationist.

Oracle - 1 week ago

Very cool. When you're looking back wondering how Elyria managed such attention to detail this is it.

For those concerned, don't discount yourself if you have interests but are worried your knowledge isn't deep enough - you may still find you're a useful and enthusiastic source and there may be no better authority to hand.

CaptainSeli - 1 week ago

One thing to remember about this program is:

SbS doesn't have an army of people looking over and vetting people who claim to be knowledgeable in their fields.

A Degree or official paperwork of some kind helps reduce the number of "False" applicants they will get, and makes the process flow much smoother. They need quality people who can back up their claims, and they don't have tons of time to diverge from developing the game to vet everyone. The degree/paperwork requirement helps them with that.

I mean, I can claim to be an Expert Blacksmith, but if I have no verifiable proof, then how can they know I really am? Maybe I'm just really good at "BSing" vs actually Blacksmithing.

Just something to think about when considering why the bar is set where its at.

LeBron - 1 week ago

Well as soon as the next spots open up I might apply. Even if not: this is so amazing! Never experienced such a great game development.

Primus Dedumo - 1 week ago

What no carpentry? Or do you already have everything needed with that?

Serpentius - 1 week ago
@Primus Dedumo:

Posted By Primus Dedumo at 1:29 PM - Wed May 09 2018

What no carpentry? Or do you already have everything needed with that?

Most likely. The list came from the game designers, not me.

Exver - 1 week ago

would you consider grade 10 history suffice?

Serpentius - 1 week ago
@Exver:

Posted By Exver at 1:23 PM - Wed May 09 2018

would you consider grade 10 history suffice?

We are aiming for those who have achieved at least a college level degree in education or experience in their specialty, or higher.

Artaer - 1 week ago

Definately been waiting for this! I'll be putting in my name for sme in mythology, religious studies and linguistics.

Sata1991 - 1 week ago

Would you consider a Bachelor's degree in art history skilled enough to help with this project? In particular my field's Welsh art.

Corialli - 1 week ago
@Sata1991:

One of the ways of proving expertise is a degree or transcript in a field of study related to one of the positions. If your degree can be applied to one of the fields there, then I bet it would be enough.

Serpentius - 1 week ago
@Sata1991:

Posted By Sata1991 at 1:15 PM - Wed May 09 2018

Would you consider a Bachelor's degree in art history skilled enough to help with this project? In particular my field's Welsh art.

I would, but whether the designers agree is up to them :)

Tiffany - 1 week ago

I know quite a bit about techniques for casting and goldsmithing but I wouldn't be so arrogant as to say I'm an expert. I've read some books about it, and watched oodles of YouTube videos, but I don't actually do it in real life myself... at least not yet. Some day.

Liva - 1 week ago

I agree with Teutknight, I feel that if they instead made the bar of "entrance" a bit lower, but required several, trustworthy sources to be quoted each time they ask for something, opens up for other people to actually have fun with it. And at the same time saves SBS from searching through sources of information that might not interest them. Not to mention they could spar with each other in each group, which is great for finding the "right" information, especially with people who interest are the same.

Right now it sounds more like a position you would actually be able to receive a hire from, especially with the high entrance bar.

But then again, if SBS gets enough applications with this form it'll be okay, I only want this game to be the best it can be in the end and succeed. :)

Raykonx - 1 week ago

I'll ask to you guys in the mail for what do you expect of a chemist :D

TEUTknight - 1 week ago

I disagree with this program as it currently stands. I feel that many people who take this as a hobbyists as long as they have sources to back their knowledge up. With all the requirements for this program and assuming the amount of time and dedication required for it, it could be a fun thing for people to do but the demands that it requires is a bit high for mere volunteer work in my opinion.

Jazz - 1 week ago
@TEUTknight:

Finding anyone with verify able course work in medieval chemistry or botany is going to be next to impossible. Mostly because the practices used back then were deemed barbaric and unethical today. Due to advances in the fields better alternatives being found leading to the older methods and treatments not being use. You can't study what is no longer used.

There are no academical course studies that cover medieval chemistry or alchemy (In the U.S). Frankly a larger portion of the herbs and fauna that were used back then are extinct or re-identified. Some have even changed there name entirely. To prove my case; Silphium was a plant that was hunted to extinction for its medicinal contraception properties by Greeks.

There wasn't Periodic table with 120 elements; back then they only believed there was 4 (Earth, Water, Air, and Fire Via Plato). Elements that we know of now didn't even have the names we associate with them today. Out side the standard metals (Iron Copper, Tin, Silver, and gold) other metals were largely unknown until later (nearly 500 years later).

Huntsmaster - 1 week ago
@Jazz:

Posted By Jazz at 8:38 PM - Wed May 09 2018

You can't study what is no longer used.

That ignores a whole swath of academic investigation called "Experimental archeology", which is of course the first subject area in the SME original post. I don't know how many of these hands-on experts are engaged in CoE at this point, but that's obviously a key target group for SMEs.

There wasn't Periodic table with 120 elements; back then they only believed there was 4 (Earth, Water, Air, and Fire Via Plato). Elements that we know of now didn't even have the names we associate with them today. Out side the standard metals (Iron Copper, Tin, Silver, and gold) other metals were largely unknown until later (nearly 500 years later).

You're missing some important ones off that list: lead, mercury, zinc, and antimony for metals, and carbon and sulfur were also known in elemental form (though you're correct that the modern definition of "element" didn't exist until the last couple hundred years). That didn't stop ancient chemists from manipulating their world, though!

bwoodfield - 1 week ago
@TEUTknight:

I agree. I've grown up with hunting and trapping; I helped my father skin and clean animals; I've been doing hobby black smithing and leather working for years; and dabbled in casting off an on since I was 14 (I'm in my 40s now). I have no paperwork that states I know anything about anything, however I still feel that I can provide detailed information. Based on the requirements and application form however I wouldn't be even considered.
90% of guys out there, including the ones who do smithing and/or leather working for a living, have no official documentation you just pick it up and start one day and eventually make enough regular income from your hobby that you quit your day job.

mickdude2 - 1 week ago
@TEUTknight:

Posted By TEUTknight at 3:47 PM - Wed May 09 2018

I disagree with this program as it currently stands. I feel that many people who take this as a hobbyists as long as they have sources to back their knowledge up. With all the requirements for this program and assuming the amount of time and dedication required for it, it could be a fun thing for people to do but the demands that it requires is a bit high for mere volunteer work in my opinion.

I tend to agree with Tuet. I've been to a couple Ren fairs and SCA events, and the blacksmiths there were all hobbyists. That didn't mean they don't know what they're talking about though, and it doesn't mean they're not historically accurate (SCA in particular). I think there should be some kind of way to recognize those without 'official' documentation, especially in the case of blacksmithing. If I apprenticed to a modern smith, I probably don't know half the shit about medieval smithing that an SCA guy knows.

Serpentius - 1 week ago
@mickdude2:

Posted By mickdude2 at 1:01 PM - Wed May 09 2018

Posted By TEUTknight at 3:47 PM - Wed May 09 2018

I disagree with this program as it currently stands. I feel that many people who take this as a hobbyists as long as they have sources to back their knowledge up. With all the requirements for this program and assuming the amount of time and dedication required for it, it could be a fun thing for people to do but the demands that it requires is a bit high for mere volunteer work in my opinion.

I tend to agree with Tuet. I've been to a couple Ren fairs and SCA events, and the blacksmiths there were all hobbyists. That didn't mean they don't know what they're talking about though, and it doesn't mean they're not historically accurate (SCA in particular). I think there should be some kind of way to recognize those without 'official' documentation, especially in the case of blacksmithing. If I apprenticed to a modern smith, I probably don't know half the shit about medieval smithing that an SCA guy knows.

I responded to that on page 2 with a quote from Snipehunter that answers yours and the other 2 posts whereas you were concerned about proving expertise. Cheers.

Elsy - 1 week ago

This is so cool! I do have a few questions though.

When we apply, I'm assuming we're applying as one of the bullet points under an area of expertise, as some of those points are very large topics. If we have knowledge in multiple bullet points of info under one area of expertise (i.e. say I can provide info for a. & c. under number 10), can we apply to both of those, or only one?

Additionally, can we apply to multiple bullet points under different areas of expertise (i.e. say I can provide info for a. under number 10 and b. under number 7)?

Of course that's not to say we'd hold 2 areas of expertise, as I'd imagine SBS would want to fill them with different people. Simply asking about the ability to apply to multiple.

Serpentius - 1 week ago
@Elsy:

Posted By Elsy at 12:46 PM - Wed May 09 2018

This is so cool! I do have a few questions though.

When we apply, I'm assuming we're applying as one of the bullet points under an area of expertise, as some of those points are very large topics. If we have knowledge in multiple bullet points of info under one area of expertise (i.e. say I can provide info for a. & c. under number 10), can we apply to both of those, or only one?

Additionally, can we apply to multiple bullet points under different areas of expertise (i.e. say I can provide info for a. under number 10 and b. under number 7)?

Of course that's not to say we'd hold 2 areas of expertise, as I'd imagine SBS would want to fill them with different people. Simply asking about the ability to apply to multiple.

You can apply for as many as you have the ability to provide and validate your expertise in.

We will accept more than 1 person for each specific area as different people have varying ways of practicing, techniques, styles, masters, history, etc...

Kitlandria - 1 week ago

What an incredible opportunity for people to contribute! I am awed at Soulbound's continued willingness to engage their community in such an incredible and open way. Can't wait to see who signs up!

Arebs - 1 week ago

You guys are absolutely amazing! I never saw a game which let his community help them in such a big way. A big thump up for this and I hope, that you find the experts you need!

Unfortunately, I'm only a programmer, so there is probely no Area of expertise for me XD

bwoodfield - 1 week ago

I've been doing hobby smithing and leather working for years. I don't have any formal education nor official documentation. Would I still be eligible to sign-up?

edit: I've also done casting (aluminium, copper, brass)

Serpentius - 1 week ago
@bwoodfield:

Posted By bwoodfield at 12:30 PM - Wed May 09 2018

I've been doing hobby smithing and leather working for years. I don't have any formal education nor official documentation. Would I still be eligible to sign-up?

edit: I've also done casting (aluminium, copper, brass)

As mentioned in the post, we're not really seeking hobbyists for this program, but thank you for your interest!

bwoodfield - 1 week ago
@Serpentius:

No worries. If you end up with a lack of knowledge in blacksmithing, leather working (with hide prep and preserving techniques), or casting I'd be available.

Kittik - 1 week ago

Might need a small "team" of people for some of these subjects.

zimmah - 1 week ago

Nice, I hope you'll find all those experts. Sadly I'm not an expert in any of those fields and probably won't be in any fields you need.

Corialli - 1 week ago

I look forward to applying for the Historical Sports position once it is available. Will we receive official updates on the CoE Discord when you open up the application process to the next group of positions?

Serpentius - 1 week ago
@Corialli:

Posted By Corialli at 12:09 PM - Wed May 09 2018

I look forward to applying for the Historical Sports position once it is available. Will we receive official updates on the CoE Discord when you open up the application process to the next group of positions?

Yes, it would make sense for us to send out an update both there and here. Great question!

Atlas Forgiven - 1 week ago

Awesome! Some people are a wealth of information in different subjects. Could a person be a SME in more than one area or is SBS trying to limit contributions to one area alone? For example a Metal worker might have in depth knowledge of medieval metalworking practices, as well as modern practices and jewelry making

Or a an actual university degreed medieval historian might also have an in depth knowledge on the unrelated topic of tracking and hunting from growing up and personal experience with trophies to demonstrate.

Serpentius - 1 week ago
@Atlas Forgiven :

Posted By *Atlas Forgiven * at 12:08 PM - Wed May 09 2018

Awesome! Some people are a wealth of information in different subjects. Could a person be a SME in more than one area or is SBS trying to limit contributions to one area alone? For example a Metal worker might have in depth knowledge of medieval metalworking practices, as well as modern practices and jewelry making

Or a an actual university degreed medieval historian might also have an in depth knowledge on the unrelated topic of tracking and hunting from growing up and personal experience with trophies to demonstrate.

Yes, you can be a SME in more than one area if you are that educated or skilled.

If you can prove it somehow, anything is possible. It needs to be on the list of what we are looking for at the time as well, keep that in mind :)

Atlas Forgiven - 1 week ago
@Serpentius:

Posted By Serpentius at 3:50 PM - Wed May 09 2018

Posted By *Atlas Forgiven * at 12:08 PM - Wed May 09 2018

Awesome! Some people are a wealth of information in different subjects. Could a person be a SME in more than one area or is SBS trying to limit contributions to one area alone? For example a Metal worker might have in depth knowledge of medieval metalworking practices, as well as modern practices and jewelry making

Or a an actual university degreed medieval historian might also have an in depth knowledge on the unrelated topic of tracking and hunting from growing up and personal experience with trophies to demonstrate.

Yes, you can be a SME in more than one area if you are that educated or skilled.

If you can prove it somehow, anything is possible. It needs to be on the list of what we are looking for at the time as well, keep that in mind :)

It might be difficult to provide degrees or high level education in tracking and hunting as its a primitive skill not really recognized or valued by modern neo liberal educations.

Plus something like bush craft isn't really the type of thing to give out certifications like say Sigma 6 which you might need for the business world. When it comes to bush craft, generally you can either do it, or you can't (You being alive and having survived harsh situations being a good a good indicator of skill). Though there are a few schools around like Tom Brown's which may give out certificates. Or perhaps ranger/spec ops school. Just some thoughts ^_^

P.s I do realize you will allow for "other" ways of proving expertise. I just don't think you should except too man "certificates" in things regarding bush craft.

Isamu - 1 week ago

Hajemisaito for medicine

HajimeSaito - 1 week ago
@Isamu:

Posted By Isamu at 03:03 AM - Thu May 10 2018

Hajemisaito for medicine

Awww schucks!!!

Thanks for the vote of confidence Isamu.

When applications open I will put forward my application and hope for the best.

Xeyska - 1 week ago

I'm looking foward to all the entries from the community and seeing their contributions added to the game. :D